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  • in reply to: Help with Locomotive bell issue #29673
    wagriff
    Participant

    I’ve seen many a locomotive bell and owned a few too, but this is a new one. Personally, I would think that you’re right in not trusting it.

    in reply to: NAMED USN WWI SUBMARINE BELL QUESTION #27156
    wagriff
    Participant

    I thought quite alot about this USN warship bell and finally came to the conclusion that in it’s deplorable state it was basically worth little to anyone and so I sent it out to a Wyoming Bronze Restoration Foundry and had them go over it from end to end and restore it to it’s original state once again. They are museum and statuary specialists in Bronze and do superb work for countless clients and organizations around the country. It was quite costly to do so, but I felt that it deserved to be restored to it’s top condition again. Yes, the clapper is likely not the way the first one looked like, but this is a nice solid bronze piece and fit perfectly so I decided that it was alright for now. If I should ever come across a supposed original clapper, I can always swap it out simple enough, in any case.

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    in reply to: NAMED USN WWI SUBMARINE BELL QUESTION #26604
    wagriff
    Participant

    I’ve been in touch about it with Jim McCurdy who is one of the largest handlers in the country of US Naval bells at TSIB -he is the one that told me that he had heard of such copper bells, but had never handled one himself. I admit, that I was, frankly, incredulous of it myself, but it is what it is, I guess. If these bells were only hung when in port and stowed when underway at sea, there would be no reason not. It’s an interesting piece, in any case.

    in reply to: NAMED USN WWI SUBMARINE BELL QUESTION #26533
    wagriff
    Participant

    Actually, it is rarer than even what I figured. I have found out that it is made of Copper! When I first verified this, I could not believe that a bell from a sea going warship could be made of Copper,but digging into it more, I found out that there were, indeed, a handful of copper made bells in the earlier days. How they could do this is this-they only mounted the bells on the subs when they were in Port. When leaving dock, the bells were taken down and stored. This may likely be the reason for the silver paint. I have decided to have it totally and professionally restored and returned to it’s original state of usage-to make it back to how it originally looked when hung on the R-10.

    in reply to: What kind of bell is this? #25839
    wagriff
    Participant

    What makes you think it is a bell? Does it have a clapper? Looks to me like it could be some sort of counterweight.

    in reply to: NAMED USN WWI SUBMARINE BELL QUESTION #25833
    wagriff
    Participant

    Hopefully, the photos will load. The Submarine was one of the “PigBoats”. the R-10 and was decommissioned and scrapped in Philadelphia in 1946. It was the 1st US submarine to have torpedo tubes.

    • This reply was modified 2 years, 5 months ago by wagriff.
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    in reply to: NAMED USN WWI SUBMARINE BELL QUESTION #25831
    wagriff
    Participant

    My question is, Were these bells painted silver, and if they were(or not) would it damage the collectability and value if I stripped it down and polished and sealed it?

    • This reply was modified 2 years, 5 months ago by wagriff.
Viewing 7 posts - 1 through 7 (of 7 total)