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Viewing 10 posts - 16 through 25 (of 25 total)
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  • in reply to: a bell from my mother #12856
    lmurgia
    Participant

    If you have a picture you can email it to me directly.

    lmurgia@twcny.rr.com

    in reply to: Hand Bells At Arabia Steamboat Museum #12858
    lmurgia
    Participant

    Hi Jeff,

    We went to the museum during the Overland Park Convention. There were one or two handbells that I remember. The curator there was very enthusiatic and helpful. I would think he might get whatever information he might have to you.

    Laura

    in reply to: a bell from my mother #12854
    lmurgia
    Participant

    Can’t tell from the description. Do you have a picture?

    in reply to: Kruszewski Foundry #12849
    lmurgia
    Participant

    Hi Peter,

    Lech Pilecki

    pilecki@newyork.bialystok.pl

    Let me know if you have success contacting him with more information.

    Laura

    in reply to: Kruszewski Foundry #12847
    lmurgia
    Participant

    Hi Peter,

    I really like this bell. The membership directory shows only one person in Poland as being an ABA member – that person lives in Bialystok. It might be worth sending him some information.

    Laura

    in reply to: Bell needs clapper #12814
    lmurgia
    Participant

    It’s been awhile since you made this posting. ABA has a few members who collect and display large bells such as this. If you still need an answer, let me know and I’ll forward your request to one of the experts in this area

    in reply to: What sort of bell is mine? Any body help? #12841
    lmurgia
    Participant

    Hi Brad,

    I believe the language to be Latin. What you have is a Hemony Bell – the one you describe is commonly called “The Crone”. The base of the bells generally have words which translate “F Hemony made me in the year 1569” It is now widely accepted that the bells were not actually made that year. No one really knows the story of why the base has this saying except that it is thought to have been a copy of a prior bell. There was an excellent article about these bells in an old Bell Tower. I can look it up this weekend and copy it for you if you are interested.

    Laura Murgia

    in reply to: Marty bell #12818
    lmurgia
    Participant

    Hi Vurie,

    I’m back from the Baltimore Convention. It was great fun. Back to your Marty Sculpture.

    Martha Carey founded Marty Sculpture, Inc in 1977 while living in Essex Junction, Vermont. She was a graduate of the Fashion Institute of Technology in New York City. She moved to Vermont in 1968. Unable to find a position as a fashion illustrator in Vermont, she attended a night class in pottery at a local high school. While making pots was unappealing, she did find a satisfaction to sculpting small figurines.

    In the late 70’s she developed a line called the Ladies of Vermont which she ‘dressed’ in period clothing and a couple of years later developed the ‘Children of Vermont’ or ‘Little Missy Bells’. They are all made of thick chalkware and have flocked dresses. There are six ladies and six girls.

    They orginally sold in a ?Downs catalog; the ladies for $19.95 and the girls for $15.95.

    Hope this is the information you were looking for

    Laura

    in reply to: Marty bell #12817
    lmurgia
    Participant

    Hi Vurie,

    I actually have quite a bit of information on the Marty Sculpture Bells (presuming you mean the chalkware bell ladies with the flocked dresses). I’m at the Bell Convention in Baltimore now and don’t have that information readily available. Email me a reminder and I’ll get the information posted after convention.

    Lmurgia@twcny.rr.com

    Laura Murgia

    in reply to: Sarna Brass #12718
    lmurgia
    Participant

    Sarna grew up in India until he emigrated to the US when he was about 20 years old. I believe he left home because he did not want to marry the girl his parents had picked out for him (arranged marriage was the norm in India during the 20th century).

    He attended college in the US and started selling Indian crafts to raise money. Bells seemed to sell the best. He bought many different kinds of bells in India, imported them to the US and often ‘made up’ descriptions of the bells and their use for tags attached to the bells. He found that bells with descriptions and names sold better.

    ‘Bells of Sarna’ was a very successful endeavor for him – and for the craftspeople of India. There are millions of Sarna bells, and an untold number of different bell designs. I recently purchased a dozen different bells in the shape of various animal heads. While I’ve been collecting bells for 30 years (my first bells were Sarna bells), there were many characters I had never seen before. As far as I know, there is no definitive catalog of all the Sarna bells.

    Sarna belonged to the American Bell Association. The tags on many of his bells had the ABA information and an address. I understand that we occassionally still receive inquiries (yours being one) from the info on the tags.

    Sarna died in the late 1970’s. His daughter, Sita is an active member of ABA. She lives in India and attended last year’s convention.

    Hope the info is what you were looking for.

    Laura Murgia

Viewing 10 posts - 16 through 25 (of 25 total)