Forum Replies Created

Viewing 15 posts - 481 through 495 (of 534 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • in reply to: what can you tell me about this bell? #13395
    Carolyn Whitlock
    Participant

    Bob,

    It’s a deal! I know there are ABA members out there who can tell us more about our bells! Now it’s a matter of getting them to post what they know!

    Thank you — Happy Holidays to you, too!

    in reply to: what can you tell me about this bell? #13393
    Carolyn Whitlock
    Participant

    Bob,

    Here is a picture of my bell that has the same base as yours, the same kind of snap clapper, and the same kind of shaft that holds the bell. I thought you might like to see it even though I don’t know anything more about it except that it is silver plate.

    in reply to: Small figural bell – looks like a maid #13381
    Carolyn Whitlock
    Participant

    Gretchen,

    You may be interested in seeing this bell of mine. It is probably made by the same maker as yours.

    in reply to: Crystal Bell with Blue Handle #13345
    Carolyn Whitlock
    Participant

    Thank you, both! I appreciate your help in identifying my bell.

    in reply to: Collector’s Bell? Need Info #13311
    Carolyn Whitlock
    Participant

    This appears to be the bell only from a St. Mark’s bell. They are often hanging from an ornate wall bracket.

    Here is what I could find about your bell online:

    Source #1 (you may have already found this online at http://www.saint-mike.org/apologetics/QA/Answers/Faith_Spirituality/f0309130410.html

    St Marks bell ? QUESTION from Kimberly on September 13, 2003
    I have a rather intriging antique St Marks bell (the style identified from an out-of-date bell collectors book)which is an old monastery hallway bell. I am searching for the meaning these bells played in the everyday lives of the monastey. They all had the same Latin inscription around them: QUI ME TANGIT: VOCEM MEAM AUDIT. What part in faith and spirituality did the ringing of these bells play? Are they still used? Christ’s peace to you. Kimberly

    ANSWER by John-Paul Ignatius, OLSM on September 19, 2003
    Dear Kimberly:
    The Latin phrase, QUI ME TANGIT: VOCEM MEAM AUDIT, roughly means I think, Whoever Touches Me Hears My Voice, and was usually found on a small bell used as a doorbell. This particular bell has a deep resinating sound that can be heard at a distance.
    I am not sure, but such bells may have been used in hallways perhaps as a wakeup call for the monks or nuns; or as the final bell announcing the Grand Silence, perhaps. The Grand Silence is usually the period after Compline (Night Prayers) until after breakfast when silence is observed.
    The bells in the Bell Tower are used to call the monks or nuns to prayers or to Mass.
    As to how many monasteries use such bells for a doorbell or wakeup call, etc., I do not know. The monasteries I have been to will have a modern doorbell and the monks, if needed, use alarm clocks.
    God Bless,?Bro. Ignatius Mary

    Source #2 The Collectors Book of Bells by L. Elsinore Springer

    “…another ecclesiastical type is seen in the ornately beautiful bells on brackets. These are associated with European monasteries and are characterized by Latin inscriptions and heavy rococo decorations often involving allegorical figures from the medieval bestiaries. As noted example of this type and one much sought after by collectors is the Saint Mark’s bell. Deeply carved musical figures decorate the body of the bell, intermingled with profuse scrolls and foliage, and a stylized griffin ornaments the bracket. Incised around two smooth bands is a twofold Latin inscription, which when translated reads:

    Our Father who are in Heaven, the Lord be with thee and with thy spirit.

    Most ecclesiastical bells afford the collector an opportunity to increase his appreciation of religious art as applied to metalwork. So many guides to religious symbolism are presently in print that it is a simple matter of find, for example, that choirs of angelic musicians encircling a bell were intended to symbolize eternal praise to God or that the eight points on a Maltese cross represent the eight Beatitudes.”

    in reply to: a certain type of bell #13167
    Carolyn Whitlock
    Participant

    If your father was given a single bell that is not hanging on a bracket, he probably has the bell only from a St. Mark’s bell.

    Here is what I could find about your bell online:

    St Marks bell ? QUESTION from Kimberly on September 13, 2003
    I have a rather intriging antique St Marks bell (the style identified from an out-of-date bell collectors book)which is an old monastery hallway bell. I am searching for the meaning these bells played in the everyday lives of the monastey. They all had the same Latin inscription around them: QUI ME TANGIT: VOCEM MEAM AUDIT. What part in faith and spirituality did the ringing of these bells play? Are they still used? Christ’s peace to you. Kimberly

    ANSWER by John-Paul Ignatius, OLSM on September 19, 2003
    Dear Kimberly:
    The Latin phrase, QUI ME TANGIT: VOCEM MEAM AUDIT, roughly means I think, Whoever Touches Me Hears My Voice, and was usually found on a small bell used as a doorbell. This particular bell has a deep resinating sound that can be heard at a distance.
    I am not sure, but such bells may have been used in hallways perhaps as a wakeup call for the monks or nuns; or as the final bell announcing the Grand Silence, perhaps. The Grand Silence is usually the period after Compline (Night Prayers) until after breakfast when silence is observed.
    The bells in the Bell Tower are used to call the monks or nuns to prayers or to Mass.
    As to how many monasteries use such bells for a doorbell or wakeup call, etc., I do not know. The monasteries I have been to will have a modern doorbell and the monks, if needed, use alarm clocks.
    God Bless,?Bro. Ignatius Mary

    Source #2 The Collectors Book of Bells by L. Elsinore Springer

    “…another ecclesiastical type is seen in the ornately beautiful bells on brackets. These are associated with European monasteries and are characterized by Latin inscriptions and heavy rococo decorations often involving allegorical figures from the medieval bestiaries. As noted example of this type and one much sought after by collectors is the Saint Mark’s bell. Deeply carved musical figures decorate the body of the bell, intermingled with profuse scrolls and foliage, and a stylized griffin ornaments the bracket. Incised around two smooth bands is a twofold Latin inscription, which when translated reads:

    Our Father who are in Heaven, the Lord be with thee and with thy spirit.

    Most ecclesiastical bells afford the collector an opportunity to increase his appreciation of religious art as applied to metalwork. So many guides to religious symbolism are presently in print that it is a simple matter of find, for example, that choirs of angelic musicians encircling a bell were intended to symbolize eternal praise to God or that the eight points on a Maltese cross represent the eight Beatitudes.”

    in reply to: CS Bell #3 How old? #13294
    Carolyn Whitlock
    Participant

    A great article about the C.S. Bell Co. of Hillsboro, Ohio, can be found at https://www.americanbell.org/belltalk/viewtopic.php?t=47 under the “ABA Library” section on the “Articles about Bells” threads. The author, Neil Goeppinger, is very knowledgable about big bells.

    Good luck,

    in reply to: Columbian Liberty Bell #13243
    Carolyn Whitlock
    Participant

    I asked Alan if there was a souvenir Columbian Liberty Bell sold at the 1893 Exposition as well as the Bicentennial Commemorative one in 1976. Here’s what he said:

    Carolyn,

    Yes, there were two different versions – 1893 and 1976. Mine is the original from 1893 and has 100 years of natural bronze patina. I think it is the only one with the engraving on the bell, and the base plate is marked as I stated.

    I don’t think the 1976 repro has engraving on the bell, and the base plate is marked as the Bicentennial replica version. I don’t have one, but there were two sold in the auction this Summer.

    Alan

    in reply to: Columbian Liberty Bell #13240
    Carolyn Whitlock
    Participant

    You’re right about the price, Harry. The flyer for the McShane Bicentennial bell says the commemorative was $95.00 for the inscribed metal standard, $109.00 for it mounted on a wood plaque, and $119.00 for it to be mounted on a wood plaque with a personalized metal plate.

    in reply to: Columbian Liberty Bell #13238
    Carolyn Whitlock
    Participant

    Mike,

    It appears that my Columbian Liberty Bell is a reproduction. It does not have any engraving on it. Although mine is a nice quality bell, I can see that it is not exactly the same as the McShane Commemorative Bell. For instance, the finial on mine seems to be a little more elongated. The ridges that go around the bell are different in number and distance apart. The clapper in mine is not quite as fine as McShane’s.

    Now, I’m curious to know if the front of all the McShane bells has the flywheel (is that the right term for it?) on the left. Mine is on the right.

    One thing I’ve noticed about many of my bells, especially the figurines and figurals, is that there are subtle differences in duplicates. It makes it harder to weed out the so-called duplicates!

    Hope this helps,
    Carolyn

    in reply to: Big Ben’s Bongs gone! #13230
    Carolyn Whitlock
    Participant

    From the website of the Whitechapel Bell Foundry

    THE STORY OF BIG BEN

    At 9′-0″ diameter, 7′-6″ high, and weighing in at 13 tons 10 cwts 3 qtrs 15lbs (13,760 Kg), the hour bell of the Great Clock of Westminster – known worldwide as ‘Big Ben’ – is the most famous bell ever cast at Whitechapel. This picture, painted by William T. Kimber, the head moulder responsible for casting the bell, shows George Mears with his wife and daughter inspecting the casting prior to despatch. Big Ben was cast on Saturday 10th April 1858, but its story begins more than two decades earlier….

    To read the rest of the story, please go to http://www.whitechapelbellfoundry.co.uk/bigben.htm

    in reply to: Big Ben’s Bongs gone! #13229
    Carolyn Whitlock
    Participant

    How did Big Ben get its Name?

    from: http://www.icons.org.uk/theicons/collection/big-ben/features/how-did-big-ben-get-its-name

    Big Ben is such a familiar sight it’s hard to believe there’s mystery still attached to the landmark’s history, but there is… Big Ben was originally the name given purely to the bell. Over the years, however, it has also become the name of the chimes, the clock tower, the mechanism and even the surrounding area. But no one is sure how the name Big Ben came to be used.

    Every large bell needs a name – for example Great Paul, the bell of St Paul’s Cathedral, is named after the saint to whom the church has been dedicated. The same goes for Great Peter, the bell of York Minster.

    But what to call this mighty bell? There are no official records on the subject, but it is thought the original idea was to call the bell Victoria, or Royal Victoria, in honour of the Queen. St Stephen and Great Stephen were also suggested after the Chapel of St Stephen inside the Palace of Westminster, whose crypt was saved from the fire in 1834.

    Big Ben – the bell

    Namesakes

    There are different theories about how the bell actually came to be named. At almost 16 tonnes, it would have appeared colossal and it is believed to have been inscribed with the name of “Sir Benjamin Hall MP Chief Commissioner of Works”. (Sir Benjamin did a lot to smooth relations between the clockmaker and the architect during difficult times and furthered the progress of the clock.)

    It has been suggested that some of the workmen responsible for testing the bell were very impressed with its great size and on seeing the name Benjamin on the inscription, decided to call it Big Ben.

    The inscription of the present, second Big Ben bell (the first one cracked) does not show the name of Benjamin Hall – by the time it was cast he was no longer Chief Commissioner.

    House of fun

    There is another, better-known story of a special sitting held in the Commons to decide on a name for the bell in 1857. This seems to have run into a long session, and Members were becoming increasingly tired of the whole thing, when the Chief Commissioner of Works, Sir Benjamin Hall, MP for Marylebone, launched into a long ramble on behalf of the government.

    He was popular with both sides of the house, had a good sense of humour, and was very tall at 6ft 4in (with a stomach to match) and was affectionately known as “Big Ben”. The story goes that as Benjamn Hall was speaking, a backbencher, longing to see the end of the debate, interrupted and said, “Why not call it Big Ben?”

    According to the tale, the house erupted with laughter and the name stuck. It is a shame, but there is no mention of this episode in Hansard (the official record of debates in Parliament), so we’ll never know if this is what really happened.

    There is also the possibility that the bell was named after Benjamin Caunt, a heavyweight prizefighter who was very popular at the time. At one stage he weighed 17 stone, and he too earned the nickname “Big Ben”.

    Which story do you believe?

    in reply to: Marty bell #12823
    Carolyn Whitlock
    Participant

    I just found pictures of these Marty Bells on page 116 of Collectible Bells by Donna Baker. They are not specifically called Marty Bells in Baker’s book. She shows “Vermont Winter Belle”, the same bell as you call “Brown Lady” and “Little Missy”, the same bell as you call “Green Lady.”

    Baker says, “Flocking provides an interesting texture for these two figurine bells. The Vermont Winter Belle is of hand cast and hand painted ceramic and wears a flocked coat. Her outfit is fashioned after nineteenth century New England dress. 7.5” high. $35-50. “Little Missy” wears a green flocked cosdtume with hip puffs tied at waist. She is also of hand cast, hand painted ceramic. 6.25″ high. $20-25.”

    in reply to: California Mission Bell #13209
    Carolyn Whitlock
    Participant

    Junipero Serra (1713-1784) was an extremely important figure in the development of present-day California. His missions not only served as the centerpiece to the development of Catholicism in California, but also as a key foundation to the growth of metropolitan cities such as San Francisco, San Jose, and San Diego. His legacy still remains along the former El Camino Real (the present day Hwy 101 & San Diego Freeway) in the form of twenty-one missions, nine of which he personally founded and developed. Each has its own individual identity, history, and unique traditions.

    There were nine of missions founded by Serra before his death in 1784. These missions were:
    San Diego, July 16, 1769; San Carlos de Monterey (Carmel), June 3, 1770; San Antonio de Padua, July 14, 1771; San Gabriel, Sept. 8, 1771; San Luis Obispo, Sept. 1, 1772; San Francisco (Dolores), Oct. 9, 1776; San Juan Capistrano, Nov. 1, 1776; Santa Clara, Jan. 18, 1777; San Buena Ventura, March 31, 1782.

    Following Serra’s death, an additional twelve new missions were founded in the following order: Santa Barbara, Dec. 4, 1786; La Purisima, Dec. 8, 1787; Santa Cruz, Sept. 25, 1791; Soledad, Oct. 9, 1791; San Jose, June 11, 1797; San Juan Bautista, June 24, 1797; San Miguel, July 25, 1797; San Fernando Rey, Sept. 8, 1797; San Luis Rey de Francia, June 18, 1798; Santa Ines, Sept. 7, 1804; San Rafael Arcangel, 1817; and, San Francisco de Solano, 1823.

    in reply to: Marty bell #12822
    Carolyn Whitlock
    Participant

    Thanks for posting the pictures, Laura! I’ve never seen any bells like those. They are quite different and attractive, aren’t they? Bell education is a good thing, isn’t it?

Viewing 15 posts - 481 through 495 (of 534 total)