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Viewing 15 posts - 31 through 45 (of 524 total)
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  • in reply to: Pls help ID my great-grandmom's bell from Mississippi #26867
    Carolyn Whitlock
    Participant

    MuddyBell,

    If you haven’t already done so, I suggest you spend some time reading through the forum at:

    Repair, Restoration, Parts, Cleaning

    Carolyn

    in reply to: Please help me identify this bell #26815
    Carolyn Whitlock
    Participant

    Sorry, joedmac, but apparently the link that I posted earlier didn’t appear in my posting. The website I had intended to post is Railroadiana.org. They have a section on bells.

    Carolyn

    in reply to: information on church bell #26814
    Carolyn Whitlock
    Participant

    From our Frequently Asked Questions page:

    What do you need to identify my bell?

    An inquiry regarding a bell should include as much of the following information as possible:

    Height of the bell
    Diameter of the bottom of the skirt
    Writing or engraving on the bell
    Material from which the bell was made
    History about the bell that you may have
    Photo of the outside of the bell
    Photo of the inside of the bell

    Are you looking for the value of this bell?
    What is the condition of the bell?
    Are the Buckeye and Vandusen & Tift names on the bell itself, on the bracket that holds the bell, or both?
    Have you done a search of the ABA website to see what you can find out about Buckeye bells and Vandusen & Tift bells?

    You say that for court purposes, you need as much info as possible. Without a picture of the bell (inside and outside) we can’t tell you much. If the Sheriff’s Office is trying to locate the previous owner, we can’t help you with that. If they’re trying to find the original owner, we can’t help you with that. If you’re looking for the value of the bell, there are professional appraisers listed online. The ABA does not appraise bells. Participants on this forum may offer an opinion of what the bell is worth.

    Another website that may provide you with some information is owned and maintained by one of our members. I suggest you make the time to see if you can find information there. It’s URL is http://TowerBells.org”

    If you decide you would like to post a picture of the stolen church bell on this website, please be sure to read the section on this website about how to resize photos should you get a message saying that your photo is too big. I believe you can find that information in the section on the forum titled “How To Use The ‘Bell Talk’ Forum.

    Wishing you luck with your search for information!

    Carolyn

    P.S. This inquiry should have been posted in the forum titled “Big Bells” You may want to ask the Website Coordinator to move your message and responses to the correct forum (Big Bells). You will get more exposure to your inquiry there.

    in reply to: Old brass bell of unknown origin #26792
    Carolyn Whitlock
    Participant

    Hello, boices5,

    I have found a bell similar to yours online. It was described as:

    An Antique 19th Century or older Hand Bell it measures12 1/4 inches in length 5 3/4 inches tall and 2 7/8 inches in circumference and weights 2 Lbs. 2 ozs. (This Rare looking Bell resembles the Tibetan nine point varja hammer weilded by their deity Damchan Dorje Legpa).

    You can see it at

    Be sure to notice the price they’re asking for the bell!

    Sorry I can’t tell you more.

    Carolyn

    in reply to: Please help me identify this bell #26790
    Carolyn Whitlock
    Participant

    joedmac,

    Carl Scott Zimmerman is a very credible expert in knowing about large bells! You might also want to check out now that you have verification that this is a railroad bell.

    Carolyn

    in reply to: please help me identify this old bell #26723
    Carolyn Whitlock
    Participant

    Hi, Jordan!

    If you go to https://americanbell.org/resources/frequently-asked-questions/, you will find a section titled “What is the value of my bell?”. It tells you the following:

    The American Bell Association International, Inc. does not appraise bell(s) nor does it maintain a list of appraisers. However, some ABA members are glad to offer an opinion based on their research, experience in buying, and watching the prices of bells on eBay, in antique shops, at flea markets, and at auctions. Please bear in mind that if you were to ask for an opinion, it would be just that. The individual would not be an official representative of the American Bell Association.

    It is not unusual for fine bells to have been made in silver (or silverplate) as well as in bronze or brass. For instance, I have two beautiful bells depicting Old Mother Hubbard that have nodding heads on them. One is silver and one is bronze. Both are beautiful bells!

    Now, back to your question about value of your bell. Another excellent book is

      Collectible Bells, Treasures of Sight and Sound

    , a Schiffer Book for Collectors, researched and written by Donna S. Baker and copyrighted in 1998 by Schiffer Publishing Ltd. This book was published 20 years ago so I can’t tell you what today’s value may be. The book says the bell pictured is a twentieth century version of an early Sanctus bell that is 4.25″ high and the underplate is 5″ in diameter. They list its value in 1998 as being $150-$175 at that time. That does not necessarily indicate that the bell without the underplate is worth that much today.

    I believe my bell is one of the 20th century versions due to its crispness of detail and shiny patina. Yours looks older to me. Please keep in mind that I am not a bell appraiser but I have been a member of the American Bell Association for over 50 years and I’ve seen a lot of bells during that time! My opinion is that yours is a very nice bell, is in good condition, and not too often seen for sale.

    There are professional bell appraisers and antique dealers who give appraisals. You may want to do an online search for “Appraisers of Bells” and see if you can get some leads.

    Wishing you luck in finding a reasonable value for your swan bell!

    Carolyn

    in reply to: Unusual Bells? #26717
    Carolyn Whitlock
    Participant

    Oops! Sorry! You can find the list of bell books in our Bell Resource Center:

    Bell Reference Books

    in reply to: Old Meneely Church Bell #26716
    Carolyn Whitlock
    Participant

    From our Frequently Asked Questions section:

    The American Bell Association International, Inc. does not appraise bell(s) nor does it maintain a list of appraisers. However, some ABA members are glad to offer an opinion based on their research, experience in buying, and watching the prices of bells on eBay, in antique shops, at flea markets, and at auctions. Please bear in mind that if you were to ask for an opinion, it would be just that. The individual would not be an official representative of the American Bell Association.

    in reply to: Unusual Bells? #26705
    Carolyn Whitlock
    Participant

    Dear Katie,

    One of the reasons we encourage people to join the American Bell Association is so they can learn more about their bells. As you realize by now, that are “zillions” of kinds of bells and many variations of basically the same bell. Of course, the condition of the bell affects its value, too.

    You have been given a wonderful gift of bells! There are many people in the American Bell Association who have been collecting, researching, and/or playing handbells or carillons for a many years. Our knowledge has been learned over time. We are glad to share our knowledge but we are not certified appraisers nor do we have paid staff to help with identification of bells. We are an all-volunteer organization.

    We are happy to suggest resources where people can learn about their bells. For instance, if you go to you will find a list of 87 books that can help you learn about different kinds of bells. Many of these books can be found in public libraries or may be able to be borrowed from other area libraries. They can often be found for sale online from stores who sell new and used books.

    As far as value of bells is concerned, if you’re interested in selling some or all of your bells, you might want to consider paying a bell or antiques appraiser or, perhaps, an auctioneer. Just keep in mind, though, when you ask for value on the ‘Bell Talk’ forum, you are asking for an opinion and that person may or may not know what today’s market and demand is.

    No one wants to sell something and then realize they have been ripped off. It’s best to do your own research by joining the American Bell Association, going to antique shows, antique shops, Goodwill and other thrift shops, etc. and look for the prices of bells like those you want to sell.

    Good luck!

    Carolyn

    in reply to: please help me identify this old bell #26704
    Carolyn Whitlock
    Participant

    Hi, Jordan,
    Your beautiful, old bell is known as the stork bell. It is a type of ecclesiastical bell and is described in

      The Collector’s Book of Bells

    by L. Elsinore Springer as follows: “The stork bell has slender profiles of the storks whose outspread wings form the skirt of the bell. Other symbolicism is noticable in the scallop shell motif (emblematic of Jesus’ baptism) and in the fish forming the handle (in Christian art, emblematic of the Christ.”).

    Originally, the bell sat on an underplate.

    My stork bell is about 4″ tall and 3 3/8″ in diameter at the bottom of the skirt. The bell is quite heavy which leads me to believe it is made of bronze but I don’t know that for a fact. Hopefully, someone who is more knowledgeable about metals can tell us.

    Enjoy your fabulous, old stork bell!
    Carolyn

    in reply to: Selling my bells #26673
    Carolyn Whitlock
    Participant

    blackjack116,

    I suggest you go to the Frequently Asked Questions section of this website. You will find some links there to suggestions for disposing of a bell collection. Also, if you send an email to the ABA Internet Coordinator Dave Elliott at coordinator@americanbell.org, he can send you a copy of an article entitled

      How to Dispose of a Bell Collection

    .

    Carolyn

    in reply to: Can anyone identify this bell? #26654
    Carolyn Whitlock
    Participant

    boomxtwo,

    This is a cable car bell. I believe they are attached to the ceiling of the cable car where the driver or conductor can pull a string to make it ring. You can find out more about cable car bells by doing an Internet search.

    Also, the American Bell Association has an article about the Cable Car Bells of San Francisco in their collection of articles from our magazine, The Bell Tower. If you are an ABA member, our ABA Librarian can send you a copy of the article electronically at no charge. Her contact information can be found at the top of page 1 of the Bell Tower Articles by Category index at https://americanbell.org/bt-index-category/. You will find the information you will need to give her when ordering this article on page 19 of 78.

    If you are not an ABA member, there may be a nominal fee for the article.

    Carolyn

    in reply to: Old school bell? #26650
    Carolyn Whitlock
    Participant

    markwc951,

    It is my guess that your bell is made of brass and was made in India. I say this because the etching on the shoulder and skirt of the bell are typically found on bells made in India. It is my opinion that this bell was made to be either a decorative item or a souvenir of India.

    I have found a picture on the Internet of a bell similar to yours although it doesn’t appear to have any etching on it. The clapper in the bell in the picture I’m posting is heavier than the one on your bell but I also notice that the heavier clapper is suspended on a piece of wire similar to yours. The bell in the picture I’m posting is engraved India.

    Here are pictures that I found:

    in reply to: Call for histories of women in bellfounding #26630
    Carolyn Whitlock
    Participant

    Nightflier51 is right. John Kolstad of the California Bell Co. has posted the following on the website of the California Missions Resource Center:

    In about 1893, when interest in “saving” the old Spanish missions was gathering steam, Ms. Anna Pitcher of the woman’s club of Los Angeles proposed that the historic trail of the mission era (El Camino Real) be preserved. By 1904 a plan had taken shape and a group of women formed the El Camino Real Association. This ultimately led to the creation of large marker bells, some 400 of which were placed along the highway and at each mission. One of the key movers and shakers in this effort was Mrs. A.S.C. Forbes. She and her husband Armitage Forbes started a manufacturing company to produce both the large marker bells and various size and type smaller bells. She ran the company for 20 years after he died.

    http://www.missionscalifornia.com/ate/have-collection-old-bells-can-help-find-out-anything-about-bell-collection-or-refer-someone” rel=”noopener” target=”_blank”

    • This reply was modified 2 years, 1 month ago by Carolyn Whitlock. Reason: link didn't appear on the posting
    in reply to: Dolfi Bells #26625
    Carolyn Whitlock
    Participant

    Hi, Beausone,

    I’ve been doing some online research as a result of your question. I have several Dolfi bells, too. First, I looked on ebay and read the descriptions of the bells listed there. So far, I have discovered that the bells are made in at least three different countries: Italy, West Germany, and Taiwan. The one consistent thread for all these bells is their carved wooden clappers were all made by Dolfi woodcarvers in Italy. You can see pictures of some of Dolfi’s “wooden figurine in crystal bells” at . There is also a section about their Collectible Crystal Bells at .

    Although I don’t know for a fact, I suspect that the bell makers provide the glass blanks and contract with Dolfi to provide the clappers. That’s my best guess. Hopefully someone else can contribute more accurate information!

    Carolyn

Viewing 15 posts - 31 through 45 (of 524 total)