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Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 534 total)
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  • in reply to: Atlantic City Country Club #27415
    Carolyn Whitlock
    Participant

    Tonydear,

    Thank you for considering posting on the ‘Bell Talk’ Forum. We’ll do our best to get answers to your questions. But: PLEASE DON’T POST YOUR QUESTION IN THIS SECTION! Why? Because people who know how to use the forum usually don’t look here for questions to answer! They only look at the categories listed below the “How to use the ‘Bell Talk’ Forums.

    Please look for the category that best describes your type of bell and place your question or comment there. You’ll have a much better chance of getting an answer.

    Thanks!
    Carolyn

    in reply to: John Wilbank bell 1835 #27359
    Carolyn Whitlock
    Participant

    Hi, Ed, and welcome to the ‘Bell Talk’ Forum! I don’t have an answer to your question. However, I don’t understand your question. Are you asking how to put the clapper back in the bell now that it has been welded? I’m just trying to clarify your need in hopes that someone can tell you what you need to know.

    Good luck!
    Carolyn

    in reply to: Can anyone identify this bell? #27039
    Carolyn Whitlock
    Participant

    Hi, Larissa,

    I don’t know what FINN means but my

      guess

    is that it might be the name of the previous owner with the “7031” meaning the number of bells in the owner’s collection when it was bought. When I take bells for display or for “Bell and Tell” at ABA chapter meetings or conventions, I usually put such a sticker inside those bells to identifying its owner.

    I definitely agree with Ailene’s information about the stamp inside the bell.

    Carolyn

    in reply to: WWII Capri Good Luck Bells #27036
    Carolyn Whitlock
    Participant

    Dear Bea,

    Your question, “Does anyone have recollection or knowledge that these bells were sold or traded in the Portland, Oregon, area between 1950 to 1970.” may be a hard one to answer. Frankly, I can only guess that it was common in the post-WWII era for antique dealers to buy up war memorabilia and resell it. Surely there must have been military personnel from WWII in the Portland, OR, area at that time. I’ve seen these bells on ebay.com from time to time, too.

    Currently, our local newspaper in New Hampshire has an ongoing daily ad telling of a person who is always looking to buy WWII memorabilia. There are still collectors of all kinds of war memorabilia.

    Good luck at finding an answer to your question! Sorry I couldn’t help.

    Carolyn

    P.S. In your research, if you did not find the website: http://www.warwingsart.com/12thAirForce/luckybell.html, you may want to take a look at it to learn more about Capri bells and their history.

    in reply to: Frog and Flowers on Porcelain Bell #27033
    Carolyn Whitlock
    Participant

    I believe I found this picture on pinterest.com. Unfortunately, I don’t own this bell. 😞 But I’ve posted it for others to enjoy, too. That being said, I have found that pinterest.com is a great place to find pictures of bells of all categories! People who want help identifying their bells may be able to find descriptions of them on that website!

    Carolyn Whitlock
    Participant

    If it were my bell, I’d give it a good washing with soap and water to clean the dirt off of it. You might want to try using a wooden toothpick to scrape off the dirt around the ridges before you dry the bell. That’s not to say that I would polish it with brass polish, however. Some collectors like their bells to be shiny. Others value the natural patina that develops over the years.

    Next I would write down the significance of the bell so future generations will know the bell’s history of being passed down through the generations from family who immigrated from Sweden. Keep that information either with the bell or in a place where your descendants can find it.

    Lastly, I would place the bell in a place where it’s visible to others. The bell and its story will make a great conversation piece to your guests, especially when you tell them it’s a family heirloom!

    Just my opinion!

    in reply to: Need any information please #26999
    Carolyn Whitlock
    Participant

    Hi, hebronkim,

    Suggestion #1 – Join the American Bell Association. Not only will you get a bi-monthly magazine filled with articles about bells, you’ll get access to free copies of all kinds of bells delivered to your email inbox upon request! If you go to americanbell.org/resources, you find many pages of titles of articles about bells. However, you must be an ABA member in order to receive these articles.

    Suggestion #2 – A good place to start identifying your bells is on online auction sites such as eBay. Do a search for brass bells and see if you can find any like the ones you have.

    Suggestion #3 – Use your computer’s search engine to look for images of brass bells. Often times you’ll get descriptions of bells and information about them.

    Suggestion #4 – Post pictures of your most unusual bells on this forum and ask if anyone can give you information about them.

    Good luck!

    in reply to: 10" high, 10 3/4" diameter at skirt brass bell #26979
    Carolyn Whitlock
    Participant

    Thanks for the explanation. Good luck in restoring this lovely bell!

    in reply to: 10" high, 10 3/4" diameter at skirt brass bell #26977
    Carolyn Whitlock
    Participant

    I can’t tell you how to polish Rear Admiral Abel Trood Bidwell’s USN bell but I do wonder why you want to polish it. It has a beautiful finish on it now, according to your pictures. I wonder if non-bell collectors think a bell looks better if it looks brand new and unused as opposed to as it looked in the late 1930s when the Rear Admiral used it. There’s nothing wrong with a bell showing its age. Food for thought.

    in reply to: Hauck & Comstock Farm Bell #26930
    Carolyn Whitlock
    Participant

    Mortimer, you would probably get some responses if you had posted your request in the forum entitled “Repair, Restoration, Parts, and Cleaning”. You might want to contact our website coordinator at coordinator@americanbell.org and ask if he can move your posting to that section. Good luck! BTW, it’s a beautiful bell. Too bad the repair is so poorly done.

    in reply to: Brass? Bronze? Bell Found on Farm #26909
    Carolyn Whitlock
    Participant

    No, I didn’t leave out a word. I said, ” It seems a bit fancy for an animal bell but it may have been used as one.” That opinion was based on the fact that it was found in a field.

    in reply to: Brass? Bronze? Bell Found on Farm #26907
    Carolyn Whitlock
    Participant

    Husker80,

    Although I have never seen a picture of this type of bell, my opinion is that it is bell. I have two reasons for thinking this. First, the handle has a hole in the stem that could mean the actual clapper was suspended on a wire threaded through the hole. Second, the picture of the inside of the bell shows a “wear mark”, that lighter colored circle where the clapper would have hit the bell when it rang.

    Since you said this bell was found in the ground, it may have been used on a sheep, for instance, or some other smaller animal such as a goat. It seems a bit fancy for an animal bell but it may have been used as one. Again, this is just an educated guess!

    Thanks for sharing this fascinating bell with us!

    Carolyn

    in reply to: Old brass bell #26906
    Carolyn Whitlock
    Participant

    Hi, Paul,

    It’s just my opinion but I think there is a lesson to be learned from your posting. When the owner said he “suspected it is around 200 years old and of Nepalese/Himalayan origin”, it may or may not be true. As a 53-year-member of ABA and a second-generation bell collector, I learned early on that dealers do not always know what the history/story/kind/origin of their bells are. Some will tell you a “good story” to entice you to pay his asking price.

    One of the first things I ask a dealer when I spot a bell that I know is over-priced or under-priced is, “What can you tell me about this bell?” I’ve gotten some really nice bells for bargain prices because the dealer really didn’t know what a gem he was selling!

    Having said that, in the case of your bells, I did an Internet search for “Nepalese Bells images” and checked out the many pictures. The shape of your bells is characteristic of Nepalese bells. Below are 3 pictures of similar shapes.

    As to the value of your bells, the ABA does not appraise bells. However, I usually recommend to people that they look at online auction sites for their kind of bell. Then bookmark those auctions and check back after the auctions ends to see what it sold for. One reason the ABA asks people to give the dimensions of their bells when asking for information is so we can give them more accurate information. For instance, we have no idea of the size of your bells.

    Food for thought! Good luck!

    Carolyn

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    in reply to: Is this a bell? #26901
    Carolyn Whitlock
    Participant

    Great discovery, Garry! I clicked on your picture attachment 8346891_object.jpg posted today, June 20th, and saw the picture of this object as the base holder of a sphere with an arrow through it and what may be a wooden base. Fascinating! For anyone interested in seeing Garry’s picture, just click on the 8346891_object.jpg link in Garry’s or my posting.

    Your research is very helpful to others!

    Carolyn

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    in reply to: Is this a bell? #26880
    Carolyn Whitlock
    Participant

    An inquiry regarding a bell should include as much of the following information as possible:

    Height of the bell
    Diameter of the bottom of the skirt
    Writing or engraving on the bell
    Material from which the bell was made
    History about the bell that you may have
    Photo of the outside of the bell
    Photo of the inside of the bell

Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 534 total)