Welcome to the ABA! Bell Talk Forums Large Bells Value of Ship’s Bell

Viewing 6 reply threads
  • Author
    Posts
    • #10966
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      Kathe writes:

      Hello, My husband and I recently aquired this big ship’s bell. It is 16″ in diameter, and weighs about 100 lbs. It is bronze, and has a cast iton clanger. Can you tell me it’s approximate worth. We also have a welded steel hanging harness for it, but it isn’t the original harness.
      Thank you-Kathe

      If you can help, please post a response.
      Admin

      This inquiry was originally sent to the ABA’s Internet Coordinator. Responses are opinions of individuals based on their personal research and knowledge.
      -01125-

    • #14090
      lucky13
      Member

      Large antique ship bells with the name, port, and sometimes the casting date are rare and worth in the thousands. Wish I could be more specific. There were a lot fewer ship bells cast than bells for public buildings and other land uses. Most were lost in sinkings or scrapped when ships were taken out of service. This ship probably served in the Persian gulf. Abangar is an Iranian (Persian) name. The tang-top mounting on the bell dates it to the 19th century, probably after 1830. Finding information on the Abangar might be difficult but would be an interesting project. I would not know where to tell you to start though. I Googled it with no results relating to a ship. Google “ship bell time” and learn the system of strikes for each half hour which is still used today. It’s interesting.

    • #14091
      dave
      Participant

      Hi lucky13. I am sorry I did not reply sooner. I am the husband of the woman that first sent a question about our find. I have done some research since then and now know that this is a steamship bell off of the SS Abangaraz. This was one of the United Fruit Company banana boats which was built in Ireland. Glascow, we think, refers to a place in Scotland where it may have been cast. It was built in 1909 and the ship was a member of what became known as the United Fruit Company’s Great White Fleet! The ship has an interesting history in that it accidentally sunk a US military sub while in the Panama Canal in 1923. The company went into a long legal liability battle over the matter and in the end was determined non-negligent. Through a series of mergers the United Fruit Company basically is known today as Chiquita. Please, any and all information people have tom offer about this bell and its potential value would be greatly needed and appreciated.

    • #14092
      lucky13
      Member

      Dave: Thanks for your reply. I based my opinion on what I could see in your photo and Abangar is all it shows. If the bell had been cast in Glasgow the name of the foundry would more than likely have been cast into it as well. By Glasgow appearing predominantly it still leads me to believe that was the seaport. Oh well, I’m no expert at this stuff. Perhaps some of our other members will offer their opinions. Good luck in your research. You do have a rare find. Ship bells of this size are hard to come by.

    • #14093
      dave
      Participant

      Thanks, hey, a couple of things, first I made a mistake. It is not Glascow, it is Glasgow. Then, our thinking that the name might represent where it was cast is simply a guess we had… If you are led to think it is a port, you have a much much greater chance of being right! I don’t know bells, but if you have a question about old fruit jars, that is a differnt storyI Now have another direction to research.

    • #14094
      Joan Elliott
      Participant

      HI, I have been doing some research on bells associated with Liverpool UK. This week my search took me to the Maritime Museum in Liverpool where I was given the opportunity to access the archives. This section of the museum has a large number of books relating to shipping and a complete collection of Lloyds Shipping Registry. The registry lists ships, manufacturer, owner, size, and where registered. It is possible that the ship was registered in Glasgow, Scotland. If you wish to contact the Merseyside Maritime Museum the link is … http://www.liverpoolmuseums.org.uk/maritime/contact.asp. When I next visit the museum I’ll try to obtain any further information for you.
      Sorry but I am unable to give a valuation on the bell.

      Joan

    • #14095
      Joan Elliott
      Participant

      For information … the SS prior to the ship’s name stands for Steel Screw, not Steam Ship as one might imagine. I think it’s something to do with the operational function of the ship.
      Joan

Viewing 6 reply threads
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.