Viewing 2 reply threads
  • Author
    Posts
    • #11520
      kappste
      Participant

      I just picked up another military bell. Ths bell only says “US”. I assume that means it was an army bell since it does not say USN. Is that correct? This bell is 9.5″ by 9″. Also I can make out a few letters stamped on the top of the bell. It looks like JUS M LOEFFLE ( few letters I can’t make out) then PHILA PA CO . Does anyone out there know exactly what is stamped on this bell. And the clapper looks a little small for this bell. I am curious if any of the readers might have a comment on the clapper also. Please email me if you have any info on this bell.

      Steve
      kalbosjk@sbcglobal.net

    • #15924
      hjlong3
      Participant

      This bell was made by Loeffler Corporation of Pendel, PA which was founded in 1926 and makes bronze valves and signalling devices for the military. If you go to their website you can purchase a modern version of this bell with raised letters “US” rather than the inset letters of your bell. It conforms to Naval specifications. The bell weighs 20 lbs, is 9.75 inches wide and the letters are 0.75 inches high. This bell was probably used as a “Forecastle” bell to ring people aboard and ashore as they boarded or departed the ship. It would have been mounted near the gangplank and would have been rung by a lanyard attached to the clapper. The letters “US” would most likely have represented the Army or Coast Guard as the Navy requires the bell to have “USN”. The size of the bell would have represented a Forecastle Bell or would have been on a small ship such as a Yard Oiler or Tug. The Army had a large fleet of transport, supply, amphibious assault ships and support vessels in order to transport the troops as the Navy did not have a large enough fleet to serve this purpose in WWI and WWII. Later in WWII, these bells were cast of steel alloy by CS Bell Co. as bronze was in short supply. The clapper is bronze as steel would have corroded rapidly. Because the bronze is softer than steel, it could be made smaller and still serve its intended purpose.
      Harry Long, MD

    • #15925
      kappste
      Participant

      Harry,

      Thanks for the information. I kind of thought you would be the first one to answer my questions.

      Steve

Viewing 2 reply threads
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.