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    • #11829
      Renee
      Participant

      Hi, I Have a set of large chime type bells to find out about. There are 15 bells mounted on a
      thick leather oval pads (3″ at least) Bells are of corse open topped, they have clacker (?) that are mounted
      on springs. Some of them are wood knobs on the largest bells (5″). The smaller bells have x shaped metal
      clacker on springs too. They are 2″ and 3″ sizes. The bells are to be mounted on the horses rump. Because of the
      large size I think they where used mostly on draft horses. ( But my dad who purchased them in the 50s
      used them on our Morgan Horses) My father told us they where very old antique bells,that is all I know about
      them. I would really like to be able to set a value on them so I can maybe sell them in the future. Can anyone
      out there help with info ????? Renee
      [attachment=0:212vdvv7]BellsForWeb.jpg[/attachment:212vdvv7]

    • #16531
      hjlong3
      Participant

      A picture or pictures would be most helpful. These could be Conestoga Bells if they are the typical harp of bells, but these usually come in harps of 2, 3, 4, 5 bells and not 15.
      Harry Long, MD

    • #16532
      Renee
      Participant

      Hi
      Thank you for asking for a picture. I added one to the post.
      Renee

    • #16533
      hjlong3
      Participant

      This is helpful. The 2 bells in the center bottom are not original and were added after the originals fell off. They are larger and have round clappers rather that the cross clappers of the other bells and should be mirror images of the 2 bells at the top center. This set was probably manufactured in the mid to late 1800s. This would not go on the rump as the clappers would face upward and would not function, but rather this chime would hang under the horse attached to the belly band or between a martingale and belly band. Rump bells generally are crotals with a bearing clapper. This chime could be used on a Morgan Horse, but its weight could cause unpleasant chafing on a smaller horse. This is an unusual set and makes an excellent addition to a collection. Despite the 2 mismatched bells, the rarity of this set would make it valuable and could bring $200-$500 from the right person. Without seeing a close-up of one of the bells, I cannot identify the manufacturer. The cross clappers were commonly used by the Bevin Brothers Manufacturing Company of East Hampton, CT from the mid 1800s until the 1930s. Thanks for the picture, it was quite helpful.
      Harry Long, MD

    • #16534
      Renee
      Participant

      Hi Harry,
      Thank you very much for the info. I will do more searching with the name you gave me.
      I don’t know if you are right about the wooden knob clackers because the tones they make
      are wonderful and harmonious with the others. By the way, I have a second set of these
      bells too. However, it has one smaller bell that is missing. Thanks again.
      Renee Tolen

    • #16535
      Carolyn Whitlock
      Participant

      Renee,

      Are the two bells with the wooden clappers the same shape as the others on the piece? It would be helpful to see a picture of the outside of the bells. You can check out the Bevin Brothers website at http://www.bevinbells.com/. You might want to send them a copy of the picture and ask if they can tell you if they made it.

      Good luck!
      Carolyn

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