Welcome to the ABA! Bell Talk Forums Large Bells please help me identify this bell

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    • #24053
      ronnyjust
      Participant

      I have inherited the “family bell” that once hung at a hunt club in Middleburg, VA. I have no information on the age or manufacturer. Would value any insights. Also want to find a more traditional cradle so would like to know sources of casted cradles. Thank you.

      Bottom of bell is 19 1/2 inches, iron casted and roughly 24 inch tall. No markings on the yolk.

    • #24054
      ronnyjust
      Participant

      I have inherited the “family bell” that once hung at a hunt club in Middleburg, VA. I have no information on the age or manufacturer. Would value any insights. Also want to find a more traditional cradle so would like to know sources of casted cradles. Thank you. Bottom of bell is 19 1/2 inches, iron casted and roughly 24 inch tall. No markings on the yolk.

      [reposting with photo]

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    • #24056
      ronnyjust
      Participant

      another view of bell

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    • #24059
      ronnyjust
      Participant

      Bell installed

      • This reply was modified 4 years, 8 months ago by ronnyjust. Reason: File didn't upload
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    • #24423
      nightflier51
      Participant

      Experts correct me if I am wrong but these type of bells were made before 1900s. The ball opposite the rope crank was to balance the bell to make it swing both sides. Later years yokes were made with the arms down lower and bells then swung both ways without a use of a counter balance.

    • #24426
      Garry
      Participant

      Hello Nightflier!

      What an interesting version of this bell. You have a very early design that I have only seen photos of before!
      It’s a great find! Any chance getting a measurement of how thick the bell is and a photo of the inside to show the clapper attachment/arrangement? I’ll check my books and see if I can find more details on it.

      What I find unique about it is the mounting of the Crank. Most have it mounted at one end or the other. Having a counter weighted one, center mounted, is definitely an older style.

      Here’s a site that shows the typical arrangement: http://www.bellsandbirmans.com/bells/bellfacts.php

      Most bells that are setup to swing both ways, have a wheel on the end that the rope wraps around, so that it’s out of the way of the swinging bell. (So that the rope won’t rub against the bell on the back swing). (see photo below)

      I’d suggest yours is a very early form of this type of bell, and I also believe – from the photos – that you likely do have one that is pre 1900.

      Since it’s from a ‘hunt club’, do you know the club’s name? Usually you can also contact them for details of the bell as it would have been a major feature of the group’s facilities. Further, even if it’s out of business, you can put a letter in the paper and ask if any of the older members have information on the bell. Also, you could ask the newspaper of the area if they have any articles about the bell/club. They often do stories on local groups and likely the bell would be featured in one of them!

      At least you would know the likely range of dates of the bell. If it went out of business in 1905, for example, then you know the bell is older! Keep any information you find with the bell.

      Here’s a bit of history of bells you might be interested in too!
      http://www.historyofbells.com/

      Keep us posted on what you find out!

      Garry

      • This reply was modified 4 years, 6 months ago by Garry.
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