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    • #10798
      hoffy
      Participant

      Can anyone identify these bells or point me in the direction of someone who can? I live in southeast Iowa. I would also like to get an approximate age/ value as I am looking to sell. I have been all over the internet and can’t find anything that looks like these. I think the one bell is a version of a saddle bell. I was given these about 20 years ago by my father but I am not sure where he got them. Thanks for your time


    • #13552
      Carolyn Whitlock
      Participant

      Dear Hoffy,

      The second bell is commonly called a “muffin bell” because of its shape. Our fellow member from England, Peter Hyde, has a picture of his muffin bell on his blog at http://www.fido-bells.blogspot.com/ . Anyone who hasn’t checked out Peter’s blog lately will be surprised to see his beautiful bells and the way he has them displayed on wooden bases made just for each bell.

      If you do a google search (I use dogpile.com) for “muffin bell”, you will find out more information. The County of Los Angeles Fire Museum Association ( http://www.clafma.org/muffinbell.html ) also has some info you might find interesting.

      I’m going to let someone who is more knowledgeable than I tell you about the other bell and what it was used for!

      They are both very nice bells!

    • #13553
      hoffy
      Participant

      Carolyn,

      Thanks for the reply. I had no idea that was the specific use for this bells I was able to find some more web sites that had information about the “muffin bells”. Hopefully, I can figure out what the other bell is. I seem to remember my dad referring to it as a camel bell. Maybe it is of middle east origin. Maybe it’s a saddle bell for a camel??

      kent

    • #13554
      Rita Walker
      Member

      Hi Kent…..Yes, you do have a saddle chime. Yours is one of the unique styles, and should sell well. Have you thought of posting it on eBay? I think it would do very well there. I wish you good luck.

      With regard to your so-called “muffin bell”. I would refer you to L. Elsinor Springer’s “Collector’s Book of Bells”, page 116. The patent for this bell was issued to E.G. Cone as No. 83.L68 in Oct. 27, 1868. He, Mr. Cone chose to call it a CALL BELL, and for that reason I have always hesitated to call it a muffin bell. It’s further called a
      “double-chiming” bell. I have a drawing of the Muffin Man, and he clearly has the open-mouthed hand bell that resembles a school marms bell or a town crier bell, (except smaller).

      To quote Springer, “Sometimes a collector is fortunate in finding a dated specimen of a bell that ordinarily carries no marking. An exact date coupled with patient searching may lead to original patent papers; and when it does these will give undisputable facts on the who, where, and why of the bell’s production–disillusioning facts sometimes, but indisputable nevertheless.” (I suggest you check the wood handle of your bell for a date).
      Springer goes on to say, “So it was in the case of the double-chiming handbell popular with collectors. This had long been accepted as a type belonging to the colonial town crier. Only recently were two of these found to have stamped on the handle the date Oct. 27, 1868.”

      I have this very same bell in my own collection. I hope I have been of some help to you.

    • #13555
      hoffy
      Participant

      Hi Rita,

      Thanks for the info. My “muffin bell” does not have a date stamped on the handle.

      I’m curious though. You mentioned that the saddle bell was unique. Could you elaborate a little more on what is unique about it?

      thanks for your time and expertise.
      kent

    • #13556
      Rita Walker
      Member

      Hi again Kent, to answer your question about the uniqueness of your saddle chime I would say this. Most saddle chimes that I have ever seen or sold have consisted of three (a troika) of bells usually arranged in a single row.
      Some have pinwheels with hanging clappers attached by finials on the top of each cup-shaped bell and that’s what creates the ringing, while others have pellet-style clappers enclosed in a “double-cup-shape” (two halves) style of bell. There are truly so many styles, I couldn’t begin to describe them. But, back to yours. You have bells in a two-step arrangement. You also have the lower step created with four cup-shaped bells, with a single bell just above. That is really what makes it unique. I don’t believe I have seen more than one or two similar to that in my 60 years of being associated with bells. By the way, you may find it interesting to learn that when I had to down-size my living arrangements I managed to take two saddle chimes with me. One is extra special. It is silver-plated, with three cup-shaped bells and pinwheels above each. They are attached to an especialls beautiful frame which is mounted on a wooden base. It is referred to as a troika saddle chime, and I was told that it must have come from royalty because a commoner would not have owned a silver-plated set, OR it was owned by someone who only used it only on Sundays when they drove to church. This would have been referred to as their “Sunday Set” of saddle chimes.

    • #13557
      hoffy
      Participant

      Rita,

      You really seem to know your bells. I’m impressed with your breadth of knowledge. Do you have an ” off the top of your head” estimate of their value? Do you know where I could find someone who could pinpoint the origin of my saddle chime or date it? Again, thank you so much for the information you have provided.

      kent

    • #13558
      Rita Walker
      Member

      Hello again,…..It’s me! I retired from the bell business about six years ago, so I couldn’t really give you a
      “today” value for your saddle chime. However, I’d like to suggest you contact friends of mine who may be able to help you. I don’t want to post their names here, so if you can send your home mailing address to Carolyn Whitlock our coordinator of this Forum, she can pass it on to you. These friends are specialists in animal bells.

    • #13559
      hoffy
      Participant

      Thanks Rita. I will contact Carolyn.

      kent

    • #13549
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      Kent,

      The e-mail address you gave me is not working for either Marie or me. Kindly resend your address to me at coordinator@americanbell.org.

      Marie has some information for you.

      Thanks,
      Carolyn

    • #13560
      hjlong
      Member

      The saddle chime is a beauty as Rita points out. It is somewhat unique in that it has two tiers. It is also unique in the design of its mounting. These usually have a loop at the base of each arm of the harp that allows it to be screwed into the harness. I’ve also seen these multitiered chimes with a central post to permit mounting to the harness. In this case your chime has perpendicular prongs that permit it to be driven into a more elaborate piece of harness. ABA Member Don Livingston may be able to help you out with further information or an estimate of value. He has a particular interest in unusual horse bells. This is a unique and beautiful chime.
      Harry Long, MD

    • #13550
      hoffy
      Participant

      Harry,

      Thanks for your response. Do you know how I can contact Don ? I checked the registry but didn’t see his name so I assume he has a “handle” that he goes by.

      kent

    • #13551
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      Anyone who may be considering giving Don’s contact information to Kent, please do so with Don’s permission and in a private message (click on PM). Please remember that anything you post on the forum can be viewed by every Internet user in the world.

      Thanks,
      Carolyn (admin)

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