Welcome to the ABA! Bell Talk Forums Small Bells Help with info on ceramic bell

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    • #10990
      brohemus
      Participant

      I have a ceramic bell that I inherited from my grandmother. Any help identifying it with a style, name, era, estimated value, etc. would be greatly appreciated. It is entirely ceramic, very light weight and delicate, yet it is in pristine condition with no damage. The light played some tricks in the pictures, but the bell consists of just two colors, pink and white, with no fading or discoloration, and a lovely, consistent glaze. It measures 3 inches tall, and 3 inches wide across the bottom. It has a pink rose on a white crown, with an outer layer of twisted pink strands over an inner layer of white strands twisted the opposite way. Bottom lip of the bell is white, and double-braided in a hexagon shape. There are tiny rosette decoratives on the sides and bottom. Thanks for your help.

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      Bottom view

    • #14172
      hjlong
      Member

      This type of bell is commonly known as a “Spagetti” Bell because of its design. They were quite common in the 1950s and were manufactured by a number of Japanese ceramic companies. They were quite reasonably priced. If there are no blemishes, they are worth more now than when they were new.
      Harry Long, MD

    • #14173
      Nice1todealwith
      Participant

      If you check Mother’s book “World of Bells No. 2” by Dorothy Malone Anthony, you can see two spaghetti bells from Italy and England. I have always found spaghetti bells to be fascinating as they often still have fingerprints imbedded in the canes and under the glaze. Thus, obviously being handmade. Some are daintier and finer than others. Alan Anthony

    • #14174
      brohemus
      Participant

      Thanks Harry, and Alan, for your replies. Spaghetti bell was the term I was looking for, as I am considering auctioning it on eBay, and needed the correct descriptive name. This bell is delicate, yet in perfect condition, with no blemishes, and I would think that it has some value for that fact alone. I can find no marks of any kind to indicate it’s time or place of origin. Perhaps the style is telling? As far as fingerprints, Alan, none can be seen. It is quite dainty, however, with a lovely, bright tinkling sound when rung.
      -Andrew

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