Welcome to the ABA! Bell Talk Forums Large Bells Help with info on a large bell

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    • #11691
      eryn.welch
      Participant

      Hello, I am the webmaster for Nauticus in Norfolk, VA. I am currently working on an online exhibit featuring the bells in our facility. One bell has us stumped.

      It looks very similar to the bell in this post, viewtopic.php?f=4&t=3091, so the role and history may be the same.

      I have two images of the bell. It is approximately 16″ in diameter and about 14″ high.

      The inscription inside says Greenberg SF-CAL.

      Thank you in advance.
      Eryn
      [attachment=1:2bc121z8]IMG00137-20110127-0846th.jpg[/attachment:2bc121z8]

    • #16236

      Maker: Greenberg of San Francisco, California – operated as Greenberg & Co. in the 1880s (probably too early for this bell) and as M.Greenberg’s Sons in the 1920s. I don’t know their full history, but other information about Greenberg is available on this Forum.

    • #16235
      eryn.welch
      Participant

      Thanks for your answer. The only thing I found on Greenberg on the forum is one other post about a bell. Where would I find the info here on the company that you mentioned? Many thanks!

    • #16233

      The conversational thread about the other Greenberg bell includes extensive information from a 1924 Greenberg catalog. I’ve not seen further information elsewhere.

    • #16234
      eryn.welch
      Participant

      Thanks. That’s the thread I found earlier. I appreciate your response.

    • #16232
      hjlong3
      Participant

      Morris Greenberg was born in Warsaw, Poland in 1823, apprenticed in a foundry in Paris, France where he married his wife Annette and had 2 sons, Leon and Joseph. Seeking his future in San Francisco during the Gold Rush, he emigrated with his family in 1851 and opened the M. Greenberg Eagle Brass Foundry. at 58 Halleck Street. He made bronze and brass fittings for ships, high pressure nozzles for Placer Mining, and cannons. The company also cast ship and church bells. In the 1870s he relocated his plant to 205 Fremont Street and son, Leon joined him as bookkeeper. Joseph joined his father and brother in the business in the eaarly 1880s. In 1871 he perfected a fire hydrant that is in use to this day in cities up and down the West Coast. In 1880, the company was known as Eagle Brass and Bell Foundry and Finishing Works. Morris died in 1884 and the company became M. Greenberg’s Sons and moved to 765 Folsom Street. In 1954, the foundry celebrated its centennial anniversary. Joseph’s sons Maurice and Stuart continued to run the company until its liquidation in 1970.

      You may wish to “Google” Morris Greenberg for his biography from Western States Jewish History Vol. XLI, No.1, 2008, pp. 125-127. or http://www.sfmuseum.org/hist8/greenberg.html.
      Harry Long, MD

    • #16237
      eryn.welch
      Participant

      Hi Harry. Yes, I found his bio you quoted in this article. I appreciate you taking the time to quote it here. I think we at Nauticus are going to have to assume the bell was used in the same fashion as the bell in the thread I referenced in my original post.

      I looked at the catalog bells referenced earlier and our bell does not have that double lip, for lack of a better word, on the bottom of the bell.

      Many thanks to both of you.

    • #16231
      hjlong3
      Participant

      I agree that this bell was a ship’s bell, but which ship and what purpose we will probably never know.
      Harry Long, MD

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