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    • #12120
      Flyerkat
      Participant

      ]Can someone help me id these bells.
      I would like to know if they are old, what era, what they were used for and how, where they attached to the carriage or horse.
      If they are of value, any other info you can help me with.

      What they would be made of. They are heavy. There are no markings.
      Does the one broken bell on the end make a lot of difference in value?

      http://im1.shutterfly.com/media/47a2d609b3127ccef0ad25ee15b600000030O00QZNG7Jq5btQe3nwo/cC/f%3D0/ps%3D50/r%3D0/rx%3D720/ry%3D480/

      Also any info on these bells:

      http://im1.shutterfly.com/media/47a2d609b3127ccef0adc5c794df00000030O00QZNG7Jq5btQe3nwo/cC/f%3D0/ps%3D50/r%3D0/rx%3D720/ry%3D480/

      Thanks! kathy in FL

    • #17140
      hjlong3
      Participant

      The first set are Hame Bells and mounted via a hole drilled in the brass knob at the top of the Hame. Hames are metal or wooden “S” shaped structures that are attached to harness and the padded collar that fits on a horse’s neck. The second picture is of a set of shaft bells that were made in the 1950s or 1960s by the Bevin Brothers Mannufacturing Co. of East Hampton, CT. The mounting is designed for this set to be mounted on a hinged bracket on the cab of an ice cream truck. Older bells that were actually attached to the wagon shft had a flat shaft to mount under the shaft or had a shape that lifted the bells up and mounted on the top of the shaft.
      Harry Long, MD

    • #17141
      Flyerkat
      Participant

      thank you SO much.

      Someone told me that the hames bells are not from horse n buggy era, but modern. How do they know that? What age would you suspect? If they are modern, what were they made for or used for? Just a reproduction? R the spikes not true functional parts?

      I new at this.

      kathy in FL

    • #17142
      hjlong3
      Participant

      Hame Bells were used as decorations. The earliest versions were the Conestoga Wagon Bells which were heavy and came in graduated sets of 5, 4, and 3 bells to be attached to the hames of the lead team, 2nd team, and rear team on a Freight Wagon. They rang to notify other teams that they were coming down the road and to get out of the way. Parade Teams had elaborate sets with colorful plumes and tuned bells. The most elaborate were on the Circus Teams. They were definitely used on horses of the late 18th, 19th and early 20th centuries. Saddle Chimes and Shaft Chimes became more popular in the late 19th Century and early 20th Century with Carriage Horses rather than the heavy Draft Animals of the Freight Wagons.
      Harry Long, MD

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