Welcome to the ABA! Bell Talk Forums Small Bells From the Gotcha Catagory

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    • #11653
      Garry
      Participant

      When is a bell not a bell?

      Here’s a very pretty bell, appears to be nickel plated brass, for the cowboy’s out there!

      It stands about 3″ high with a bull’s head mounted at the top.
      It has a number “7806” stamped on the underside of the bull’s neck.

      What is interesting is the third photo- no clapper!
      Doesn’t even look like there ever was one!

      So what is it?

      (grin) see next posting for answer! :mrgreen:

    • #16139
      Garry
      Participant

      Well, did you guess?

      (or did you cheat and just look ahead for the answer? 😕 )

      In either case, here’s the next hint. Look at the photo with the bell in this orientation!

    • #16140
      Garry
      Participant

      Yep! It’s a CUP! 😛 😛 😛 😛 😛

      I have seen “bells” as Banks, as Paperweights, and even in a wedding loving cup format, but this is the first one I have seen in a ‘shot glass’ type form!

      So do any of you have any other unusual bells to share with us?

      It might be interesting to see what other types of ‘When a bell is not a bell, gotchas our members have!’

      Garry

    • #16141
      halanb
      Participant

      The first picture shows two champagne bottles, silver-plated bronze, 5″, engraved Sillery and Champagne Reims respectively. The second picture shows that the one on the left is a bell and the one on the right is a pepper grinder.

    • #16142
      halanb
      Participant

      The first picture shows two brass objects, each about 5″, and familiar to anyone who collects brass bells.
      However, the second picture shows that both are inkwells.

    • #16144
      Garry
      Participant

      I particularly like the inkwells!

      Neat items!

      Garry

    • #16143
      Denise Kushner
      Participant

      The bell with the bulls head is a drinking cup. They used them in medieval times. They are all ways made so that they stand up when the head is down. That way they can set a cupful of liquid down on a level surface. They were often carried on horses by a looped cord that that hung from the saddle. Inns and such did not supply cups in those days so you had the carry your own. They were made with many different animal heads. The bull was often used because it balance so well on the horns. Hope that answers.
      Denise

    • #16146
      Garry
      Participant

      Denise
      Thanks for the reason it was made! I hadn’t thought of the fact that the now ubiquitous disposable cups etc. did not really exist way back when. If I had thought about it at all, I would have figured that local potters would have turned out cheap pottery versions by the truck load. But likely the more gentile folk would have carried their own. I suspect this would have been more of a transition cup as it’s pretty small (barely bigger than a good sized shot glass). Perhaps a form commemorating the earlier versions?

      The three point ‘head’ stand has an additional benefit, like a stool it would sit without rocking even on an uneven surface!

      Do you have any unusual ‘bells’ to share too?

      Garry

    • #16145
      Garry
      Participant

      So why would I post a tea pot?

      Look closely at the third photo!

      The inside seems to be silvered (makes sense to protect the tea from the metal and vise versa!)

      It’s a good sized pot: about 7 inches in diameter (not counting spout or handle) and 4.5 inches tall without the lid.
      The ‘lid’ is 4 inches high by 3 1/2 inches in diameter.

      Ding Ding! Tea’s ready!

      Garry

    • #16147
      Garry
      Participant

      This is a hand carved Bell – sort of – with a tag that says:
      Creations in Wood, Made from Locust, and Wood Carving by Jim Griffin.

      Picture one shows a very nicely done wooden bell. I particularly like the way he has incorporated a small vine pattern around the upper 1/3 of the bell neatly hiding the fact that the bell has been split in two at that location!

      The bottom of the bell (picture 2) gives away the fact that this is not actually a bell. “How Great Thou Art”

      Anyone out there have any history of either the Carver or the company?

      Thanks
      Garry

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