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    • #10758
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      David in Oregon writes:

      Hello, I am working on a 24 inch (cs) school bell for a church. The rope pulley (wheel) broke into 6 pieces. I am having it brazed up. Also, one of the stands needs a new pedestal. that I manufactured and is ready for brazing. The clapper also needs brazing, as part of it was not casted properly? dates back to 1904. This one has 2 springs with leather. One person (todd) says they are not needed in a small bell?
      Trying to figure what to ask for repairs in labor and costs. Bell #2 is a 40 inch church bell (cs) being used at a football game. Clapper is corroded off. and has been painted numerous times and is always outside… I figure this whole thing weighs about 1500 lbs. needs total restoration.. I believe it had two springs also but are gone. Do not know, if these are needed to clang at football games? Bell number 3, a rumsey and Co., bell 24 in. Needs a new rope pulley wheel.. Is on display at a church. not used, just for visual. dates back to the late 1800’s. Some one tried to weld a steel piece to the cast iron outer ring. Corrosion is a big problem., I am trying to figure what is available for repair parts, replacement parts and the cost to me. Also, what a company would charge do a restoration.. Have not found a place on the west coast. Seems they are all back east.. Have to figure sand blast and possible powder coating to help preserve if left outside. Thank you.. David

      John has responded:

      Last year, Bells Novelty Casting Co., the decendents of CS Bell went out of business. Since that time, the value of the CS Bells has doubled. Parts are rare, and expensive, if you can find them.

      I have a machine shop duplicating the CS Bell casted parts, manufacturing from stock steel.
      Cast iron from the 1800’s was “crystal” metal. i.e. the iron casting process was done in a manner that the iron would actually crystalize …. giving the bell a nice sound vibration.
      At around 80 years, the crystaline iron becomes very brittle. Welding rarely hold up, unless you heat the entire piece before welding…be very careful.
      Bell parts are based on the cost of design, material, and machine shop labor, which varies greatly nationally.
      Crystaline metal bells should be sandblasted, if very coroded, or wire brushed, primed and finish painted, regardless of interior or exterior location.

      Blessings!

      John

      If you can offer other information, please post a response. If you need help posting, please contact me at coordinator@americanbell.org. Please be sure to reference this post as from “David in Oregon” if you are going to send information to me. Thanks

      Admin

      This inquiry was originally sent to the ABA’s Internet Coordinator. Responses are opinions of individuals based on their personal research and knowledge.

    • #13444
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      John has sent more specific information:

      Bell parts are custom fabrication per bell. The price is based on material costs and $40. / per hour shop time. I need to send you a survey sheet for each part & bell; you will need to fill it out, and then I can quote the part. Do you have a fax that I may sent the survey sheet to?

      The leaf springs inside the bell, represent a difference in bell ringing technique.
      The North Americans & English fabricators believe that the clapper should travel in the opposite direction from the bell, thus creating a very violent impact. The French believe that the clapper should travel in the same direction as the bell, as the bell stops at the apex of the swing, the clapper continues, impacting the bell based on the weight of the clapper.
      The leaf spring inside English and North American bells was engineered to prevent the clapper from “bouncing” a second time on the bell after intital impact. The clapper bouncing on the bell (1) may cause the bell to crack, and (2) creates a harsh second set of vibrations, not at all pleasing.
      Iron becomes more brittle with age, thus the springs in the larger bells become more important. Manual bell ringing technique is poorly understood in North America, many bells are broken due to poor bell ringing technique.

      Blessings!

      John

      Admin

      This inquiry was originally sent to the ABA’s Internet Coordinator. Responses are opinions of individuals based on their personal research and knowledge.

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