Welcome to the ABA! Bell Talk Forums Bell Foundries, Manufacturers and Artisans Buckeye Bell Foundry, VanDuzen & Tift

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    • #10903
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      Gary writes:

      I HAVE RECENTLY PULLED OUT A HEIRLOOM BELL WHICH I HAVE HAD STORED FOR MANY YEARS. IT HAS ON ONE SIDE BUCKEYE BELL FOUNDRY 1882, ON THE OTHER SIDE IT HAS VANDUZEN & TIFT. IT IS 15′ TALL AND THE OD IS 21 3/4 INCHES. IT HAS ONE CHIP IN BOTTOM RIM WHISH I WAS TOLD WAS PUT THERE BY A RIFLE FALLING ON IT. I AM CURIOUS ABOUT THE THE VALUE AND HISTORY SINCE I CAN’T SEEM TO FIND MUCH. COULD YOU PLEASE HELP ME. SINCERELY, GARY

      If you would like to see photos of Gary’s bell, please click on these links:

      http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3256/2595194723_d1e2782584_o.jpg
      http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3257/2595182915_79c9c5aab0_o.jpg
      http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3051/2595182869_36b9ec9315_o.jpg

      If you can help, please post a response.
      Admin

      This inquiry was originally sent to the ABA’s Membership Chairman. Responses are opinions of individuals based on their personal research and knowledge.
      -00953-

    • #13930
      hjlong
      Member

      This is a very nice bronze bell. This foudry was in Cinncinnati, OH. The bell is worth whatever an interested buyer is will ing to offer, but you should be able to get in excess of $1500 if you have the yoke and “A” frames.
      Harry Long, MD

    • #13931
      Neil Goeppinger
      Participant

      The Buckeye Bell Foundry was started in 1837 by George Washington Coffin and was located on Second Street between Broadway and Ludlow Streets in Cincinnati. It may have been the successor to the Riga Furnace in Salisbury, Conn founded by Holley and Coffin in 1810.

      W. A. Van Duzen was apprenticed to Mr Coffin, and by 1865 he and a Mr. Tift had bought out the company and changed its name. The G. W. Coffin Co made the most ornate bells ever made in the U.S. Some had cheribs and puti on them, and others had dancing girls in flowing vails circling around the top of the bells.

      Vanduzen changed his last name along the way to be one word instead of two, and also changed the shape of the bells and dropped the ornate work. There are just a few ornate Vanduzen bells made during the first couple of years after Vanduzen took over, but they must have been special order because most bells made even then were plain. Balancing that, the sound of the Vanduzen bells was much improved over the Coffin bells because of the change of the shape of the bells. Vanduzen made thousands of bells, and the name of the foundry changed several times as different family members ran it in different generations. The name Vanduzen & Tift was used from 1865 to 1894. When the firm closed in the early 1950’s, it was called E. W. Vanduzen.

      Their bells were well finished and very smooth, had a good tone, and had a unique mounting with a large hole in the top of the bell with a disc used to hold the bell to the yoke. –Neil

    • #13932
      gary perrin
      Member

      I APPRECIATE ALL THE INFORMATION YOU HAVE PROVIDED IT WILL BE A BIG HELP. THANK YOU FOR YOUR TIME. SINCERELY, GARY PERRIN

    • #13933
      Rob Schultz
      Member

      I’m the Great-Great Grandson of Charles Martin Van Duzen, youngest brother of E.W. (Ezra Williams) Van Duzen.

      According to the family bible of my Great-Great Grandmother, the spelling is “Van Duzen”. I seen several variants in my family research.

      Here’s his memorial on Findagrave.com:

      http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=55837034

      Some family notes:

      – Ezra’s brother Benjamin Cadwell Van Duzen founded the B.C. Van Duzen Gasoline Engine Co.

      – Ezra’s son Frank Van Duzen was co-founder of the Van Duzen, Roys Company in Columbus, OH., which also produced engines. He is buried in the E.W Van Duzen family plot with his father.

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