Welcome to the ABA! Bell Talk Forums Large Bells Anchor Brass and Aluminum Co. USN Bell

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    • #10870
      hjlong
      Member

      A picture would be helpful. The CS Bell Co. manufactured a similar designed bell out of cast steel during WWII for the Navy for small boats when brass and bronze were in short supply. These bells were probably made out of brass before the shortage led to the steel version. I know nothing about this company. The Navy would not have purchased Aluminum bells as they would quickly corode in the ocean spray and would have a terrible tone due to aluminum being such a soft metal.
      Harry Long, MD

    • #13796
      hjlong
      Member

      The pictures greatly contribute. This is a bronze Navy bell and given it’s small size was probably used on a small boat rather than a ship. The Us Naval History Center at http://www.history.navy.mil may be able to assist with identifying the class of boat on which it was used.
      Harry Long, MD

    • #13797
      hjlong
      Member

      It is a beauty, but because of its relatively small size & lack of mounting bracket, it should be worth no more than $500.
      Harry Long, MD

    • #13798
      hjlong
      Member

      In browsing the web, I came across a site that has this bell with mount. They call it a USNavy Foredeck Anchor Bell. You may be interested in . They have some beauties.
      HJLong, MD

    • #13799
      hjlong
      Member

      While I was reviewing some material at the Navy Historical Museum web page , I found an article about US Navy Ship Bells that may be of interest. Pages 171-174 of the Naval Artificers Manual, 1918 gives details for ship & boat bells. They are to be made of Bronze (“78% Lake Superior Copper & 22% new block tin”) and the clapper is to be made of “Gunmetal” (90% Copper and 10% Tin). The letters “U.S.S. (name of ship) and year of completion” are to be cast in relief on ship’s bells and “U.S.N.” on the bells of motor boat and power-propelled vessels for which no name is assigned. The size of the bell and tone is specific for the size of the ship or boat:
      1-Power boats 26-65 feet inclusive-20 lbs-“A” Flat
      2-65+ feet and up to 200 tons displacement-30 lbs-“A” Natural
      3-Tugboats over 200 tons displacement-60 lbs-“D” Flat
      4-Torpedo Boats 200-700 tons displacement- 60 lbs-“D” Flat
      5-Destroyers 200-700 tons displacement- 60 lbs-“D” Flat
      6-Other Vessels 200-700 tons displacement-60 lbs-“D” Flat
      7-Destroyers >700 tons displacement-75 lbs-“B” Natural
      8-Vessels 700-1000 tons displacement- 75 lbs-“B” Natural
      9-Vessels not specifically described above-75 lbs-“B” Natural
      A-1000-2000 tons displacement-200 lbs-“G” Natural
      B-2000-6000 tons displacement-300 lbs-“E” Natural
      C-6000-12,000 tons displacement-600 lbs-“B” Natural
      D->12,000 tons displacement- 800 lbs- “B” Flat
      E-Fuel Ships, Transports, Supply Ships, Repair Ships and Hospital Ships-300 lbs-“E” Natural
      The size of the lettering is also specified based on the size of the bell. Specifications for the design of the bell are also specified.
      I found this information interesting. It can help you determine what type of ship or boat a bell went with.

      Harry Long, MD

    • #13800
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      At the request of the original poster on this topic, I have removed his/her postings. However, Harry has contributed so many interesting facts about USN bells, I wanted to leave on his information. – Admin

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