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    • #12452
      Lorrie
      Participant

      Our church bell reads “cast by Henry N Hoper Boston. Our records indicate we purchased the bell in 1843. Is this bell by Henry N Hooper? Seems strange the name would be mis-spelled.

      How can I find out information about the bell? (weight, material)

      Our church is celebrating it’s 300th anniversary and will be ringing the bell 300 times.

      Thanks.
      Lorrie

    • #17831

      A photo of the whole bell and a closeup of the inscription would both be helpful, because each bellfounder has a distinctive style. Typos in inscriptions in bells are rare but do occur. If indeed it is a Hooper bell, then it is made of bronze. Weight can be estimated from a measurement of the diameter across the mouth.

    • #17832
      Lorrie
      Participant

      Thanks for your reply. I have some photos but don’t know how to add them to this note. I’ll get some help to do that. We will try to measure it on our next visit up to the bell.
      Lorrie

    • #17833
      Carolyn Whitlock
      Participant

      Lorrie,
      If you go to the Frequently Asked Questions section https://www.americanbell.org/forum/viewtopic.php?f=20&t=3773, you will find directions for how to post pictures on the ‘Bell Talk’ Forum. If you need more help, please let me know.

    • #17834
      Lorrie
      Participant

      [img]bell8_zpsdc2ac749.jpg

      I’m hoping this is one image of the bell.
      Lorrie

    • #17835

      Yes, that is undoubtedly a Henry N. Hooper bell. The style of the bell and its fittings are all quite consistent with his work.

      Congratulations! Your church bell has the first example I’ve ever seen of a typo in the maker’s name. Typos in custom inscriptions are more common (though still fairly rare).

    • #17836
      Lorrie
      Participant

      We just got back from visiting the bell. We measured the diameter at the bell – it is 38 1/2 ” . The height seems to be 29″ and the diameter across the top of the bell seems to be 18″.
      Thank you for your help. I’m so pleased it is a Henry N. Hooper bell.
      Lorrie

    • #17837
      Lorrie
      Participant

      What was the purpose of the second smaller clapper that strikes from the side. Ours is no longer connected, nor is there a rope for it. Did it make a different sound?

      Do they make “covers” for the rope so ringers don’t have to wear gloves?
      Thanks.
      Lorrie

    • #17838

      It’s a tolling hammer, intended primarily to toll the bell for funerals, though it can be used for other purposes where a measured strike is wanted instead of the regular pealing of a swinging bell. It is not a clock hammer, which would be mounted to strike the outside of the bell.

    • #17839
      Neil Goeppinger
      Participant

      Hello Lorrie, Carl pretty well answered your question about the use of the tolling clapper. In some churches (Missouri Synod Lutheran for one) it is used to ring quietly 3 strikes at 3 different times during the Lord’s Prayer (at total of 9 strikes). At least, that is how it was used at Trinity Lutheran in Boone, Iowa.

      You may or may not know that Henry N. Hooper was one of the firms which traced their linage back to the Paul Revere bell foundry in Boston. — Neil

    • #17840
      Lorrie
      Participant

      Thanks, Neill. I will use that information in our displays on Jan 4 when we start celebrating our church’s 300th anniversary by ringing our bell.

      Yesterday we located a second bell that I believe is also a Henry Hooper bell, dated 1838. It is smaller and was purchased for “The Academy” – a school started by our church. It is inscribed 1838 H H. I’ll post a picture and measure it soon.

      Lorrie

    • #17841
      Lorrie
      Participant

      Here is a picture of the “Academy Bell”

      [img]academybell4_zps54ac4611.jpg

      The letters say H H 1836. I’m thinking it’s Henry Hooper.

      The diameter is 17″; the height from the base of the bell to the top of the curve (not the handle) is 15.

    • #17842
      Lorrie
      Participant

      Here is a second photo of the 1836 Academy Bell.
      [img]academybell5_zpsf4f8e9b3.jpg

    • #17843
      Lorrie
      Participant

      This shows the H H
      [img]academybell3_zpsb8051bc7.jpg

    • #17844
      Carolyn Whitlock
      Participant

      Lorrie,

      The late Harry Long posted this advice about cleaning bird droppings off of a bell:

      Re: Buckeye Bell/Vanduzen & Tift

      Post by hjlong3 ยป Fri Jun 26, 2009 10:57 am
      The patina is a chemical reaction with the bronze that provides a protective coating to the bell and should not be removed if the bell is to be kept out of doors. A brass or bronze wire brush and a good detergent and water is all that is needed to remove bird droppings and dirt from the bell. Do not use a steel wire brush as steel is harder and will scratch the bronze. If there is paint dropping on the bell, use a solvent paint remover, but expect the patina to be different under the paint. It may take several years for that patina to match the remainder of the bell.
      Enjoy your bell and its melodious sound.
      Harry Long, MD

      There are several postings about bird droppings on bells on the ‘Bell Talk’ Forum. You may want to do a search for “bird droppings” and find more advice about cleaning bells.

    • #17845
      Lorrie
      Participant

      Thank you for the info about cleaning the bell.

      How much would the 17″ bell weigh? The chart doesn’t go that small.

      Lorrie

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